Commando Dave's BBQ

Venison Tenderloin Medallions

I was fortunate enough to harvest some venison this year and wanted to share with you how to prepare some world-class venison tenderloins. One of the big challenges with venison and other lean game meats is inexperienced chefs and hunters tend to use the same cooking methods and times as when they cook beef and pork (both of which tend to have much higher fat content). Venison, especially the tenderloin, is very lean and only requires a quick sear and a brief rest before serving. I used my Disciple Rub on these medallions because I thought the complexity of the rub would complement the deep flavor of the venison. This wonderful cut of venison would pair well with herb-crusted red potatoes and garlic-parmesan green beans. Bon appetite, grill commandos, and – again – please check out the good folks at Lonestar Warriors Outdoors and Poverty Canyon Ranch!

Venison Tenderloin Medallions

Venison: lean, healthy, and packed with flavor. Punch up your venison with Commando Dave's Disciple Rub.
Prep Time1 d
Cook Time20 mins
Resting Time5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Tenderloin, Venison
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 223kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 lb venison tenderloin Cubed into 1" medallions
  • 1 cup whole milk May substitute buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp butter may use olive oil
  • 1 tbsp Commando Dave's Disciple Rub may use Caveman Rub
  • 3 twigs rosemary used as a basting brush (may omit)

Instructions

  • Soak the venison medallions in milk in covered container overnight in the refrigerator.
  • Remove medallions from milk and season on all sides with Disciple Rub. Don't rinse off the milk or otherwise dry the medallions. The milk adds flavor and helps braise the medallions.
  • Tie three strands of rosemary together to form a basting brush.
  • Heat sauté pan over medium-high heat until the pan is hot enough that a drop of water sizzles off of the pan.
  • Add butter (or olive oil) and let it melt and come to temperature (butter will foam and just start to brown).
  • Add seasoned venison medallions.
  • Sauté the medallions until they form a brown crust and the moisture begins to evaporate in the pan, about 5-8 minutes
  • Note how the moisture is mostly evaporated. Now is the time to turn the medallions.
  • Turn the medallions over and use the rosemary brush to baste the crust on the medallions.
  • Note how I use the rosemary basting brush, which adds TONS of flavor to complement the robust venison flavor.
  • Once the medallions have browned on the bottom and the majority of the liquid has evaporated (about 5-8 minutes), immediately remove the medallions to a plate to let rest for 5 minutes before serving.
  • Please note the importance of removing the medallions from the heat immediately after they have browned. That is essential to prevent overcooking of your venison (a mistake inexperienced chefs and hunters make). We want our venison medallions (which is a very lean meat) to be medium rare so that they have flavor and moisture.

Notes

Venison (deer meat) is one of the great meats in Americana. Healthy, lean, and packed full of flavor; venison has sustained countless families throughout history. I was blessed to be selected by Chris Gill and his Lonestar Warriors Outdoors team for a once-in-a-lifetime Wounded Warrior hunting trip in San Angelo, TX. Eight of us Wounded Warriors were blessed with an amazing experience of fellowship, shared healing, and world-class hunting. Four of us hunters had the opportunity to join the team at Poverty Canyon Ranch to harvest whitetail deer. Folks, I can't say enough good things about the Lonestar Warriors Outdoors and Poverty Canyon Ranch teams; these amazing people make a HUGE positive difference in the lives of Wounded Warriors (including me). PLEASE check out their websites and consider supporting them.
I was fortunate enough to harvest some venison this year and wanted to share with you how to prepare some world-class venison tenderloins. One of the big challenges with venison and other lean game meats is inexperienced chefs and hunters tend to use the same cooking methods and times as when they cook beef and pork (both of which tend to have much higher fat content). Venison, especially the tenderloin, is very lean and only requires a quick sear and a brief rest before serving. I used my Disciple Rub on these medallions because I thought the complexity of the rub would complement the deep flavor of the venison. This wonderful cut of venison would pair well with herb-crusted red potatoes and garlic-parmesan green beans. Bon appetite, grill commandos, and - again - please check out the good folks at Lonestar Warriors Outdoors and Poverty Canyon Ranch!

Nutrition

Calories: 223kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.5g | Protein: 34g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0.2g | Cholesterol: 105mg | Sodium: 110mg | Potassium: 460mg | Fiber: 0.3g | Sugar: 0.01g | Vitamin A: 198IU | Vitamin C: 0.5mg | Calcium: 18mg | Iron: 5mg
  • I was fortunate enough to harvest some venison this year and wanted to share with you how to prepare some world-class venison tenderloins. One of the big challenges with venison and other lean game meats is inexperienced chefs and hunters tend to use the same cooking methods and times as when they cook beef and pork (both of which tend to have much higher fat content). Venison, especially the tenderloin, is very lean and only requires a quick sear and a brief rest before serving. I used my Disciple Rub on these medallions because I thought the complexity of the rub would complement the deep flavor of the venison. This wonderful cut of venison would pair well with herb-crusted red potatoes and garlic-parmesan green beans. Bon appetite, grill commandos, and – again – please check out the good folks at Lonestar Warriors Outdoors and Poverty Canyon Ranch!

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